Health 2.0 SXSW panel on sensors

Health 2.0 recently submitted a panel proposal for SXSW (South By Southwest) 2013 titled, “Sensor Technologies: The Future of Health?” The proposed panel includes me and an outstanding group of speakers including Indu Subaiya of Health 2.0, Eric Dishman of Intel, and DJ Patil of Greylock, promising a spirited discussion about how sensor technologies are […]

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Saul Griffith’s Curriculum of Toys

This is framed as a way to think about the education of kids, which it is, but it’s also a useful guide and spark for weekends, summer, and as road trip / camping checklist. Saul Griffith’s A Curriculum of Toys from Make Vol 28. 

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New Public Health – Interview with Ted Smith

The New Public Health site of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation features the Asthmapolis project in Louisville this month. The post, built on an interview with Ted Smith, Louisville’s Director of Innovation and Economic Development, makes a clear connection between health issues – in this case environmental exposures to poor air quality – and regional […]

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Farm exposure and childhood atopy, wheeze, lung function, and exhaled nitric oxide

Some interesting new results from the GABRIEL study examining children living on farms and the development of wheeze and other objective markers of asthma and allergies today. The project, which involved nearly 9,000 children, reported in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology that children living on farms are protected against wheeze independently of atopy. […]

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My account in the Personal Story Network

Healthgrades has a collection of personal stories from patients, healthcare providers, caregivers, and others from the front lines of the healthcare system. My account – describing my career in asthma research and the development of Asthmapolis – is posted here along with others from people like Regina Holliday and Dave deBronkart.

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Asthma Prevalence, Health Care Use, and Mortality in the United States, 2001–2010

Two major asthma epidemiology reports today from CDC. The National Center for Health Statistics released the latest data brief analyzing trends in asthma prevalence, health care utilization and mortality in the US from 2001-2010. Most of the news is not good: Prevalence rates of asthma have reached 8.4 percent, the highest ever recorded in the […]

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Interview with RWJF Human Capital Blog

Last week I spoke with Matt Freeman, one of the editors of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Human Capital Blog, about the development of Asthmapolis and where we’re headed as a company. The conversation is posted here.

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Questionnaire layout and wording influence prevalence and risk estimates of respiratory symptoms in a population cohort

One of the more interesting aspects of asthma epidemiology is the challenge of identifying who in a population has the disease. By and large, asthma remains a clinical diagnosis, made on the basis of a characteristic history of symptoms, occasionally supported by physiological measurement. Without a discrete clinical test, epidemiologists have to rely on proxy […]

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Crossing paths with James Crow, the geneticist (1916-2012)

Jim Crow, a pioneer and legend in the field of population genetics, and an influential and widely loved faculty member here at the University of Wisconsin, died last week at the age of 95. John Hawkes has a fantastic profile of him here, while his faculty page at the UW Laboratory of Genetics faculty testifies to his seemingly […]

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CDC releases National Asthma Control Program state profiles

CDC has set up a new page collecting short (two-page) burden of disease profiles from the 36 National Asthma Control Program grantee states across the US. These summaries highlight key statistical data, such as prevalence and health care use in adults and children, as well as data on patient education and medication use from the […]

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